7 Money Rules To Never Break

It’s #4 and #5 for me. If you are at a point in your life where you feel stuck use the many resources around you to get out of your situation:

• The Library
• Book Stores
• The Internet (Financial Blogs/YouTube)
• Social Media Money Profiles
• Seminars

As an adult you have two choices; to complain about how your life isn’t going, or to make the active changes needed to place you in the position that you want to be in.

Article By Aura Bea Carter

The Only 3 Things You Need To Start Investing

As you begin learning about finances you will see that the techniques to start making money are pretty much the same.

Now, people create their own rules, use their own methods but overall you are not doing anything much different from people earning more money than you.

You just have to decide one day that you want to develop the skills to be successful.

Join Robinhood with my link and we’ll both pick our own free stock 🤝 https://join.robinhood.com/kadeshc-cc2017

Open a crypto account here: https://coinbase.com/join/carter_uk9?src=ios-link

Best Regards,

Aura Of Wealth

Facebook Loses Users Plummeting $200BN: CEO Zuckerberg Blames TikTok

Facebook lost daily users for the first time in its 18-year history. CEO Mark Zuckerberg believes Facebook’s decline in users is likely due to the boom in popularity of the competitor platform TikTok.

Facebook lost daily users for the first time in its 18-year history in the final quarter of 2021, which CEO Mark Zuckerberg believes was caused by the TikTok boom.

The social media giant’s devastating earnings report on Wednesday sent Facebook shares plunging more than 20 percent, wiping more than $200 billion off the company’s market cap and erasing $29 billion from Zuckerberg’s net worth.

Facebook reported a drop of nearly 500,000 in daily logins during the last three months of 2021. 

‘People have a lot of choices for how they want to spend their time, and apps like TikTok are growing very quickly,’ Zuckerberg said during an earnings call Wednesday, according to the Washington Post.

Zuckerberg reiterated that Meta – the company that owns Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp – is pushing hard to develop its short-form video Reels in an effort to compete with TikTok.

‘This is why our focus on Reels is so important over the long term,’ he added.

Facebook, which now only has 1.93 billion users logging in each day, also saw its shares plunged more than 20 percent in extended trading on Wednesday after unexpectedly heavy spending on its Metaverse project led to a rare decline in its fourth quarter profit.

Meta saw its stock fall 22.6 percent to $249.90 in after-hours trading, wiping about $200 billion off the company’s market value.

The company heavily invested in its Reality Labs segment – which includes its virtual reality headsets and augmented reality technology – during the final quarter of 2021, accounting for much of the profit decline.

Zuckerberg, who is worth approximately $107 billion, held more than 398 million shares of Meta at the end of 2020, according to Investopedia. Based on his reported holdings, the CEO personally experienced a more than $29 billion loss when the company’s stock fell Wednesday.

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8 Movies Every Entrepreneur Should Watch for Inspiration

Whatever phase you are at in your entrepreneurial journey, there’s a lot you can acquire a knowledge of from these money motivated movies.

1. The Social Network tells the story of how Mark Zuckerberg started Facebook while studying at Harvard and how he was later sued by two brothers who stated he stole their idea, and his best friend who was ousted from the company.


2. Startup.com tells the story about the rise and fall of internet companies during the dotcom bubble. Startup.com is a documentary film that follows the story of GovWorks, a promising startup that failed spectacularly because of mismanagement and internal power struggles.


3. Wall Street tells the story of ambition and greed, portrayed brilliantly by Charlie Sheen and Michael Douglas respectively. The main protagonist, Bud Fox, idolizes Gekko and gets carried away by his glamorous lifestyle, only to get entangled in the vicious web of insider trading.


4. The Big Short tells three separate but parallel stories of individuals who were able to predict and profit from the American financial crisis of 2007-08.


5. Boiler Room takes a look at stock broking through the eyes of a man who is trying to get rich quick. This movie depicts what happens when brokers get a little too carried away with their status and access.


6. Fyre festival was supposed to be the greatest music festival ever. Organized by Billy McFarland and rapper Ja Rule, the “luxury music festival” was promoted on Instagram by celebrities and social media influencers, including Kendall Jenner, Bella Hadid, and Emily Ratajkowski. The only problem? It was all a scam, devised by MacFarland who had a history of starting up fraudulent business ventures.


7. The Founder is a biopic of the American fast-food tycoon Ray Kroc. Starring Michael Keaton, the movie tells the story of his creation of McDonald’s fast-food restaurant chain, which became the biggest restaurant business in the world. It also stars Nick Offerman and John Carroll Lynch who play the McDonald brothers, the original founders of McDonald’s.


8. The Pursuit of Happyness is a true story based on the life of entrepreneur Chris Gardner’s nearly one-year struggle of being homeless with his son while going through a grueling 6-month unpaid internship as a stockbroker. Will Smith’s portrayal of Gardner earned him an Oscar nomination.

Article Inspired By: 21 Movies Every Entrepreneur Should Watch For Inspiration


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How To Invest In Crypto Without Buying Coins

Cryptocurrency investing has a steep learning curve. Even personal finance expert Suze Orman found it “aggravating” when she first attempted to invest using a cryptocurrency exchange.  

“It was just too complicated for me,” she recently told NextAdvisor.

And as a volatile, highly speculative investment, many investors are appropriately cautious. But for those who are interested in crypto but not in buying and holding actual cryptocurrencies, there are still ways to invest, albeit indirectly. And you might already have exposure to cryptocurrency without even knowing it.

The easiest way to get investment exposure to crypto without buying crypto itself is to purchase stock in a company with a financial stake in the future of cryptocurrency or blockchain technology.

But investing in individual stocks can bear similar risks as investing in cryptocurrency. Rather than choosing and investing in individual stocks, experts recommend investors put their money in diversified index funds or ETFs instead, with their proven record of long-term growth in value.

“Believe it or not, most individuals with a retirement plan or an investment portfolio allocated in an index fund already have some exposure to crypto,” says Daniel Johnson, a CFP with ReFocus Financial Planning.

Many of the best index funds — like S&P 500 or total market funds — include publicly traded companies that have some involvement with the industry by either mining crypto, being involved in the development of blockchain technology, or holding significant amounts of crypto on their balance sheets, says Johnson. 

For example, Tesla— which holds over a billion dollars in Bitcoin and accepted Bitcoin payments in the past— is included in any funds that track the S&P 500. Since its 2020 inclusion, it’s become one of the most valuable, and therefore influential companies in the index. And Coinbase, the only publicly traded cryptocurrency exchange, is in the ARK Fintech Innovation ETF. 

However, if you have some extra cash (and you’re tolerant of the risk), you can choose to allocate a small amount of your portfolio to specific companies or more specialized index funds or mutual funds. “An investor bullish on the future of cryptocurrency could invest in the stocks of companies working on that technology,” says Jeremy Schneider, the personal finance expert behind Personal Finance Club. 

Experts generally recommend keeping these speculative investments  — whether a single company’s stock, specialized index funds, or cryptocurrency itself — to less than 5% of your total investing portfolio.

Investing in Companies with Crypto Interests

That’s how personal finance expert Suze Orman initially did it. She recently told NextAdvisor about how she invested in MicroStrategy, a cloud computing firm that holds billions in Bitcoin, because its CEO was putting all of the company’s working capital into Bitcoin. She figured if Bitcoin increased in value, so would the value of Microstrategy’s stock.

But as anyone who follows Orman’s advice knows, she recommends index funds as a much better investment strategy than picking individual stocks.

Rather than buying shares in any single crypto-forward company, it’s better to maintain a balanced portfolio by identifying companies with crypto interests, and making sure their shares are included in any index or mutual funds you put money into. Not only does that allow you to invest in the companies where you see potential, but it also helps you keep your investments diversified within a broader fund. 

If you invest with Vanguard, for example, you can use the site’s holding search to find all the Vanguard funds that include a specific company. Just enter the company’s ticker symbol (like TSLA for Tesla) and the tool will offer a list of all the Vanguard products that have holdings of its shares. Other investing platforms offer similar ways to search by company within index and mutual funds.

But specialized ETFs or mutual funds can also come with higher fees than total market indexes, so pay attention to how much you’re going to be charged for buying shares. Schneider considers an expense ratio (what you pay in fees) under 0.2% to be very low, and anything over 1% to be very expensive. For an already speculative investment, high fees can hinder your growth even more.

Here are a few more examples of publicly-traded companies that are adding Bitcoin or blockchain technology to their business. These are definitely not the only companies involved, and more are joining the list every day. (Circle, a digital payment platform specializing in crypto payments, for example, just announced its intended IPO):

MicroStrategy (MSTR)

MicroStrategy offers business intelligence and cloud services, and invests its assets into Bitcoin. 

Marathon Digital Holdings (MARA)

Marathon Digital Holdings aims to be the largest bitcoin mining operation in North America.

RIOT Blockchain (RIOT)

Riot Blockchain is a Bitcoin mining company. 

Bitfarms (BITF)

Bitfarms operates blockchain computing centers. 

Galaxy Digital (BRPHF)

Galaxy Digital is a broker-dealer involved in crypto investment management, trading, custody, and mining. 

Tesla (TSLA)

Tesla’s founder Elon Musk, is a proponent of cryptocurrency, and the company holds over a billion dollars worth of Bitcoin. It temporarily accepted Bitcoin payments in early 2021 before ending the program, but Musk recently said Tesla will “most likely” restart Bitcoin payments.

PayPal (PYPL)

PayPal is a payment platform where people can purchase cryptocurrency.

Square (SQ)

Square recently announced that it would be entering the decentralized finance space.

Coinbase (COIN)

Coinbase is the first public cryptocurrency exchange. It debuted on the Nasdaq in spring 2021.

Blockchain ETFs

ETFs — exchange traded funds — operate like a hybrid between mutual funds and stocks. An ETF is essentially a group of stocks, bonds or other assets. When you buy a share of an ETF, you have a stake in the basket of investments owned by the fund. 

While many ETFs — such as total market ETFs — have very low expense ratios, specialized ETFs can be closer to the 1% ratio that Schneider would consider very expensive. This will make less of an impact if more expensive ETFs comprise a small portion of your overall portfolio, keep in mind the cost when considering options.

ETFs are often grouped by what sort of investments they hold, so one way you can indirectly invest in cryptocurrency is by putting money into an ETF focused on its underlying technology: blockchain. A blockchain ETF will include companies either using or developing blockchain technology. 

Many people who are skeptical about cryptocurrency but believe in the “transformative” blockchain technology behind it see blockchain ETFs as a much more sound investment.

It’s like the California gold rush of the 1800s, says Chris Chen, CFP, of Insight Financial Strategists in Newton, Massachusetts, for a recent NextAdvisor story about blockchain technology: “Lots of people rushed in there to dig for gold, and most of them never made any money,” he said. “The folks who made the money are those who sold the shovels. The companies that are supporting the development of blockchain are the shovel sellers.”

ETFs are created by different companies, but you can often buy them through whichever brokerage you typically use to invest. Just like you can search your brokerage for individual stocks, you can also search for funds using the symbols associated with them. Here are a few blockchain ETFs currently available to investors (with listings on popular brokerages like Fidelity, Vanguard, and Charles Schwab):

BLOK (Amplify Transformational Data Sharing ETF)

BLOK is the largest blockchain ETF by total assets. It’s largest holdings are PayPal, MicroStrategy, and Square.

BLCN (Siren Nasdaq NexGen Economy ETF)

BLCN’s top holdings are Coinbase, Accenture, and Square.

LEGR (First Trust Indxx Innovative Transaction & Process ETF)

LEGR’s top holdings are NVIDIA, Oracle, and Fujitsu. 

Crypto ETFs

For would-be crypto investors who are deterred by exchanges or buying and holding actual coins, one simpler way to invest — via crypto or Bitcoin ETFs — has remained out of reach. 

Plenty of companies — from crypto exchange Gemini to longstanding investment firm Fidelity — have attempted to offer Bitcoin ETFs. But so far, all such U.S. proposals have either been rejected by the Securities and Exchange Commission or remain under consideration, as the SEC continues to drag its feet through the approval process. 

A crypto ETF would be a major step in bringing cryptocurrency to U.S. investment portfolios, 

offering American investors the ability to invest in digital currencies like Bitcoin or Ethereum without having to learn to trade on a crypto exchange. 

The only similar option for U.S. investors today are private trusts that hold cryptocurrency, such as Grayscale Bitcoin Trust or Osprey Bitcoin Trust. These funds allow accredited investors to buy shares directly at market value, but anyone can buy secondary market shares through a brokerage account with a traditional firm, like Fidelity. There are management fees associated with the trusts to keep in mind, though (2% for Greyscale and 0.49% for Osprey) which can make this method of Bitcoin investment more costly than a commission-free blockchain ETF or buying crypto directly from an exchange.

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