Why Knowing The Difference Between Outdoor And Indoor Cannabis Matters

As someone who has cultivated indoor cannabis and harvested outdoor cannabis, I think knowing the difference between the two is critical.

”Cannabis is just cannabis,” well not exactly.

The natural method allows for the plant to grow and thrive without the harsh chemicals many indoor growers use.

Because you are manipulating the growth of a plant that has been outdoors for literally thousands of years, most indoor growers (dispensaries included) don’t have the patience, wherewithal, or knowledge of how to grow the plant without chemically-based nutrients, pesticides, and so on.

If you know an individual who grows cannabis sustainably, even if it costs more, please continue to support them.

The Difference Between Indoor- and Outdoor-Grown Weed (and Why It Matters)

From Article:

Indoor Growing Is About Control

First, it’s important to point out that cannabis can’t be grown outdoors just anywhere. In a weed-heavy state like California, the moist north, with its forests and gullies, is quite hospitable to an outdoor cannabis growing season, while its arid south is a hub of indoor cultivation.

Robert Masterson, a cultivator at A Golden State, told us that standardized methodology is their motivation for growing indoors. “Cannabis grown indoors can be given the perfect amount of light per square foot and unique spectrums of different lighting sources to maximize terpenes and potency,” he said. “Not all indoor cultivators can completely control their environment, but when done correctly they can achieve the highest genetic potential of specific cultivars.“

This means that by using data and technology, cultivators can fine-tune every element of the process for each strain in pursuit of the holy trinity: higher yields, higher potency, and bespoke sensory qualities. For some consumers, this is precisely the type of cannabis experience they are seeking.

While myths about “today’s” THC contents being higher than ever have been circulating since the mid-2010’s, that push has been consumer-driven, not tech-driven. In 2015 The Atlantic reported the “shift toward high potency has arguably more to do with contemporary market forces than with a younger generation of marijuana enthusiasts.”

Flavor and strong THC content are not only driven by indoor cultivation but they are ensured by more consistent growing conditions. As Masterson told us, however, “not all indoor cannabis is grown equally. Make sure you choose a brand that truly understands what they are doing. It costs more to produce cannabis in a controlled environment. Prices at a retail store generally reflect that.”

Outdoor Can Be Quality Too

The corporatization of cannabis costs the ecosystem a lot, regardless of the cultivation method. While growers like A Golden State and Wonderbrett put effort into sourcing sustainable utilities and lowering their impact, while many indoor growers just use as much plastic, electricity, water, fertilizer and resources as they think they need to get the highest yields and THC possible.

That’s why Raeven Duckett Robinson, Co-founder of Community Gardens in Oakland, California is on #teamoutdoor. “It’s like [the] Twizzler versus Red Vine debate. I support outdoor because it’s more affordable—and weed should be grown outdoors anyways; indoor gets over-hyped and it’s bad for the environment.”

She told us, “based on the regulations and the way we need to package, keep records and receipts for a legal cannabis operation, there’s a lot of waste created, especially in terms of packaging. The amount of energy indoor wastes unnecessarily adds to the environmental footprint of the entire industry. The amount of energy it takes to grow the plant [indoors] is significant, and I believe it’s inefficient and unnecessary because they can grow outside with light from the sun.”

Sam Ludwig is in alignment with Robinson’s thinking—that nature makes the best weed. “Indoor products will always look sexier with a denser structure and more visible trichomes on the exterior but indoor typically provides a shallow high and reduced medicinal properties,” he said. “The plant has been growing in nature under the sun, moon and stars for millennia, not indoors in a windowless room [lit by] LEDs.”

Along with Aster Farms CEO Julia Jacobson, Ludwig’s wife and resident dirt scholar, they designed an outdoor operation a little differently: “At Aster we grow in-ground in live soil filled with bugs, fungi, and bacteria breaking down organic matter to feed the plants. We feed the soil because the soil feeds the plants. It’s just a different approach from top to bottom, and we believe it produces a superior product with superior effects.”

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Article Compilation By K. Crystal Carter

K. Crystal Carter is a cryptocurrency and blockchain enthusiast who is originally from Oakland, California. She has 7.5 years of experience in the financial industry, and 6 years of being a cannabis hydroponics grow director and cannabis advocate at local City Hall meetings. She currently resides in Las Vegas as one of the lead Earthy Realist team members.


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Finding The Most Sustainable Place To Grow Cannabis

recent study published in Nature is the first of its kind to attempt to quantify greenhouse gas emissions across the US caused by growing cannabis indoors. The study found that:

  • On average, growing a gram of cannabis inside a commercial grow produces as much greenhouse gas as driving a car for nine miles.
  • Out of a pool of 1,011 cities modeled by researchers at Colorado State University, the location with the least greenhouse gas emissions from indoor cannabis cultivation was Long Beach, CA, where growing an ounce produces 143 pounds of carbon dioxide.
  • The city with the highest emissions was Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, where producing the same amount of indoor cannabis results in 324 pounds of CO2, a stat that’s roughly equivalent to burning 16 gallons of gasoline.

Grow Where It’s Temperate

The Nature study is based on a new model of indoor grow inputs and outputs from Ph.D. student Hailey Summers in CSU’s School of Global Environmental Sustainability.

“We built a model from the ground up that models commercial cannabis energy needs and material needs,” says Summers, a graduate student studying mechanical engineering. “So how much water does a commercial facility generally need, how many fertilizers, what types and then also a full HVAC system.”

The report shows in Colorado, the greenhouse gas emissions from the commercial cannabis industry are on par with other sectors such as coal mining and trash collection, sitting at about 1.3% of the state’s annual emissions total. Many Colorado cities ban outdoor pot-growing, and it takes a ton of energy to keep the plants happy in a controlled indoor environment. Growers in harsh, cold places such as Colorado and states in the Midwest, expend way more electricity optimizing the temperature and humidity of the indoor environment than growers in more temperate coastal climates, places like California and Washington state. That means that the best spots to grow outdoor weed are generally the best places to grow indoors.

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EarthyRealist.com – #CryptoCannabisCulture

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Why Cryptocurrency & Cannabis?

Cryptocurrency is the solution to the cannabis industry’s banking problem that stems from the DEA’s outdated Schedule I status of cannabis as a controlled substance instead of the natural healing plant that it is. In comparison, investors of cryptocurrency and consumers of cannabis products (especially CBD) are individuals of society who understand the power of innovation and elevation.

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Globally our website and social media subscribers are based primarily in the United States but are from almost every country with internet access. We are based in Las Vegas, NV, and tourists learn about our website from our local media promotions.

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Nevada Leads The Way For Veterinarians To Treat Pets With CBD

Starting this October, veterinarians licensed in Nevada can recommend and administer hemp and cannabidiol products containing not more than 0.3% tetrahydrocannabinol without fear of sanction from the state licensing board.

Earlier this year, Gov. Steve Sisolak signed Assembly Bill 101, making Nevada the first state to legalize the use of cannabinoids as a veterinary treatment. The Nevada Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners helped write AB 101, which the Nevada VMA supported, according to NVMA Executive Director Michelle Wagner.

The bill’s sponsor, State Assemblyman Steve Yeager, introduced the measure in February because Nevada law was unclear about whether veterinarians were permitted to administer CBD products or discuss them with pet owners.

“Because of the ambiguity in our law, I learned that many veterinarians chose not to talk about CBD with pet owners for fear of being disciplined,” Yeager said. “This left pet owners in a tough spot because CBD products are generally unregulated, and it would be difficult for a pet owner to know exactly what to purchase or administer without the professional advice of a veterinarian.”

Nevada voters approved medical marijuana for people by ballot initiative in 2000. Cannabis became legal for recreational use in the state on Jan. 1, 2017, following a 2016 ballot measure.

AB 101 encountered no opposition and passed the state Assembly and Senate without a single no vote, Yeager explained.

“I certainly hope that other states follow Nevada’s lead and provide reassurances to licensed veterinarians that they can administer CBD or talk about it with patients without fear of facing disciplinary proceedings,” he said. “The bill itself is fairly simple and, thus, is a good model for other states.”

Although products containing 0.3% or less THC are exempted from the federal Controlled Substances Act, the products do fall under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act if they are used therapeutically or included in animal food. The Food and Drug Administration considers the therapeutic use of these products to be the use of unapproved drugs.

A Simple Question

But do medical cannabinoids actually help animal patients?

It’s a deceptively simple question at the heart of an animal health concern complicated by a tangle of federal and state regulations, research challenges, and species-specific pharmacokinetics.

Dr. Dawn Boothe is a professor of veterinary physiology and pharmacology at Auburn University studying cannabis’s potential as a veterinary treatment. She sought to make sense of the issues during her presentation “Medical Cannabinoids Revisited” at AVMA Virtual Convention 2021 on Aug. 1.

The cannabis sativa plant contains more than 90 unique compounds, or cannabinoids, including CBD and THC, as well as almost 500 other terpenoids and phenylpropanoids. For several millennia, humans have used cannabinoids for pain, epilepsy, gastrointestinal disorders, and even infections.

Dr. Boothe said research interest in the therapeutic use of cannabis in the United States essentially came to a “screeching halt” in 1971 with the federal Controlled Substances Act, which listed cannabis as a Schedule 1 drug, meaning the federal government regarded cannabis as having no therapeutic properties and a high potential for abuse.

“That’s changed in the last couple of decades as, increasingly, states are paying attention to medical cannabinoids,” Dr. Boothe said. “But I do shudder to think sometimes about how much we would have learned if we had taken a different path in our reaction to cannabis.”

The federal government’s position on cannabis has somewhat softened in recent years, most notably with the 2018 Farm Bill’s removal of industrial hemp containing 0.3% or less of THC from the Controlled Substances Act. That said, the use, sale, and possession of cannabis over 0.3% THC, despite laws in many states permitting it under various circumstances, is illegal under federal law.

Making Sense of It All

The restrictions on veterinarians haven’t diminished interest among pet owners, who have available to them a veritable pharmacopeia of CBD products claiming to treat any number of animal ailments and behavioral problems.

None of the products are approved by the FDA, which, as Dr. Boothe explained, raises concerns about variability in cannabinoid concentrations, mislabeling, and contamination with harmful additives, such as fentanyl or synthetic cannabinoids.

“If you’re looking for a product that has a certificate of analysis that you can have faith in—as I would—go to the USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture) website and look at the laboratories that the DEA (Drug Enforcement Administration) has approved as being appropriate for analysis of hemp crops,” Dr. Boothe said. “That at least can increase the level of validity for that product.”

Then there are questions about what constitutes a therapeutic dose of cannabinoid in a particular species as well as which formulations actually deliver that dose to the animal patient. There’s evidence that, in dogs, the route of CBD administration, such as in a soft capsule containing oil, may increase the oral bioavailability, according to Dr. Boothe.

“Hemp seed oil, sesame seed oil, and medium-chain triglycerides are the most common oils that are being used,” she said. “We need to see data demonstrating the differences in oral bioavailability among these different compounds.”

Cats are more challenging. “We’re going to have to have some good pharmacokinetic studies providing us information about dosing and cats,” Dr. Boothe said. “We have demonstrated that in cats there is variability in absorption, but, as in dogs, feeding will enhance that absorption.”

Dogs appear to tolerate CBD far better than THC, which was shown to cause ataxia when administered intravenously in smaller, less-concentrated doses than CBD. Dogs were also found to build a tolerance to cannabinoids over time.

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